Little things

Yesterday was one of those days that come along just when you need a reminder that the world is not actually filled with horrors.

Ellis was very kindly invited to a birthday party at the Metrocentre, I have a love hate relationship with the place.  I only like parking where there are 2 spaces next to each other which is a near impossibility here and for someone that suffers from anxiety my biggest fear is no quick escape route to fresh air,  there’s no windows when you are walking about and it makes me feel claustrophobic, sometimes.

I found my little bit of sanctuary after dropping Ellis off at Game and found I had 2.5 hours to do whatever I please.  Yay says the Christine who craves time alone, boooo says anxious Christine – what if I need to leave earlier, what if I have a panic attack etc etc.  I wandered straight to Waterstone Cafe and bought the book I had been waiting for.  Notes on a nervous planet by Matt Haig.  All bout how to stay sane in a world that is anything but, ironic that 2 armed cops were stood outside the window when I looked up.  My incessant need to be attached to social media for my charity work and Reilly will be the downfall of me and something I need to address and get some organisation in my life.  We’ll see how that goes, its not the first time i’ve said it!

I grabbed a tea, soya milk and tiffin and started to read.  I could have stayed for days.  I NEVER do things like this.  Im that busy trying to be busy to stop overthinking everyday life I had forgotten there are simple pleasures in actually taking 5 minutes for myself.

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I then decided I would do something else I never do and went for a make up consultation at Urban Decay.  I an absolute gem of a girl called Rhona invited me to take a seat and we chatted while she explained what a setter was and the likes and even proved they work by doing a demo, i’m cynical, i’m not the girliest of girls and still apply all of my makeup  with one finger, quick dressing gown wipe for next product, you get the picture.  Anyway she was right I was wrong and that never happens.  We discussed our love for Harry Potter and got to talking about Reilly, lack of sleep, autism and defibrillators in no particular order.

When I was leaving she gave me her email address and said she was inspired by the things we talked about and she would love to do my makeup for free for our winter ball in December.  I nearly cried.  Biggest of thankyous to Rhona she probably has no idea how much she made my day and i’ll definately be taking her up on her offer.

Little things that restore my faith in human nature.  Ellis had a great day at  his party, Reilly had a great day at the beach with his dad and I went to bed trying to read my book by the light of my phone trying not to disturb the tiny cherub sleeping peacefully beside me.

A good day xx

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Pop Fantastic 

Don’t you just love it when you order something and then forget its coming and it’s the best surprise when you see it drop through the letterbox!

Earlier in the week I ordered a book called Pop Fantastic. The book is about Pop who is 7 years old, autistic and the writer is from the North East – what’s not to love here?  obviously I was going to buy it.

The book written for children and not just autistic children is beautifully illustrated and the perfect length to keep little curious minds happy.


The story shows that although Pop experiences things differently those things make him incredibly special. A magical land, a new friendship and a hero in the making.  I see this as a perfect bedtime story and will be reading it to Reilly tonight.  I hope to see more of Pops adventures.

More books with autistic characters please 😊.

You can buy Pop Fantastic (The Adventures of) by clicking this link:

My Sons not Rainman

I came across this book while browsing twitter one night while lying in bed worrying about the future as you do, well I do.  I sometimes lie for hours scrolling through #autistic #autism #meltdowns making myself feel better with other peoples frustrations or jubilations.

I liked the title immediately.  If you have an autistic child you will be familiar with the fact that a lot of people expect your child to have a remarkable magic talent.  “What’s his thing?” “I bet he’s good with numbers” are the common ones.

Not all autistic people are Savant’s. Savant’s are people who have incredible abilities usually falling into a few different categories to name a few:

Musical abilities – being able to playback perfectly a piece of music after hearing it only once.

Artistic abilities – Stephen Wiltshire a prime example his ability to remember skylines and reproduce them in drawings is breathtaking.

Calendar Calculation – being able to produce the day of a week a date falls on thousands of years away.

Memory – Reilly has an awesome memory and shocked us all when he started to google  bus registration numbers and we realised they were actual buses he had been on or seen weeks even months before – but I don’t think he’s Raymond Babbitt. If he is I’ll meet you at Aspers!

The book written by comedian John Williams really struck a chord with me.  I related to everything he said but its so funny too.  My favourite part is his disability top trumps and that SEN parents can be arseholes too.  I don’t want to spoil it for you.  But I am guilty as charged – If your child had 4 hours sleep mine had 3.  I also lol’d at the school shoes and too short tracksuit bottoms I see this week in, week out.

It’s honest, it’s sad and its thoroughly enjoyable.  ‘The Boy’ as he is loving referred to has an amazing relationship with his father despite the many challenges they face over relationships, schools, behaviour, disability etc.

You can click on the link below for more information.  Myself and my Mam read this book on holiday and now my husband is half way through and loving it and sometimes not loving the stark similarities in our lives.  I thoroughly recommend it.

Communication frustration 

How do you communicate with a non verbal child?


Reilly understands pretty much everything we say to him. He doesn’t always acknowledge that we’ve spoken but I’m pretty certain he’s heard us none the less.

I’m astounded at how well we manage to be honest, we always eventually seem to get to where we want to be and to what he needs. Probably through years of just knowing Reilly and what makes him tick. Reilly doesn’t nod or shake his head either, these tiny gestures alone could help us 1000%.  It is heartbreaking though during a meltdown or when he is unwell to not be able to comprehend what is happening or how to fix it. Not knowing how his day at school was or whether he’s not comfortable around someone and we can’t put it right.

Reillys preferred method of communicating at the moment is to take you by the hand to whatever he wants. If he’s not happy he screams, cries and throws things. If he’s happy you just know it, it’s there to see he’s cuddley, smiley and an absolute joy.

We tried makaton like Mr Tumble. We attended sessions to learn how to do it. Simple hand signs that eventually Reilly would pick up on and use spontaneously. Problem was holding Reillys eye contact long enough for it to click.

mtw

 

We have used this book More Than Words  (pricey but worth it and will resell) for over a year now to help understand the different types of communication problems and the exercises they recommend.  Its a very good book very easy to read with lots of diagrams and clear instruction.

 

 

PECS (picture exchange communication system) is what we are trying to use at the moment. I bought hundreds of pictures ready laminated from eBay. I attached magnets to the back of the pictures that I thought Reilly would use the most and attached them to a magnetic board. Makes me sound like a blue peter presenter doesn’t it? Far from it, the pictures stay on the board for approximately 1 hour on a good day. Reilly likes to take them all off and scatter them about the house.
PECS does work though and we will stick with it, when he is bored he brings the bus and slide pictures which usually means he wants to go to soft play. He will bring the picture of some chicken nuggets when he wants a trip to McDonald’s but that’s about it for now.  I keep photographs on my phone of places we may visit to limit his anxiety when we go out in the car.  It is important that he understands where we are headed to make him more comfortable and eliminate fear.

 

This is an example of a good PECS board, how it should look.
this however is how ours looks today with added scribbles

Something we were encouraged to do is put the fridge in our garage which is locked so instead of Reilly being able to just go and get what he needs he must communicate to tell us to open the garage door, this would be a winner if Reilly wasn’t so fiercely independent. He would rather create a climbing frame to reach the lock. He’ll pile pans on top of the washing basket or dining room chairs to gain some height. All of our dining chairs now live in the garage and only come out once a year at Christmas.

Other than that it’s guess work and trial and error. Frustration rules the day most of the time. We have locks on the outside of the bathroom to stop Reilly getting in. It’s really difficult to make him understand that yes Lightning McQueen might need a car wash but leaving the plug in and running water continuously is not how it’s done. I could switch the tap off 200 times and he would never tire of turning it back on.

The biggest problem we have at the moment with communication is sneezing and coughing. If I cough Reilly will attack me like a banshee he pulls my hair, hits and scratches. He has had me in tears on occasions.  He’s not that bothered about other people doing it although he has in the past hit me for someone else’s cough. We’ve tried warning him that it’s coming, tried turning it into a game, made songs about it absolutely nothing works, it devastates him. Maybe it’s because some autistic people feel pain attached to sounds, maybe he has misophonia an extreme emotional response to specific sounds.We just don’t know he can’t tell us and its heartbreaking!

This for me is the most difficult part of Reilly’s autism. I cannot bare the thought that we may never have a conversation but I am hopeful that he will talk, it’s not uncommon for children with autism not to talk until later years.  Just try for one day to imagine you cannot communicate with your child and think about how you would get on. I would predict tantrums and frustration from both parent and child because it’s hard! It’s something that I never had to give a seconds thought to with things 1 & 2, I just took it for granted like most of us do.  I’d love to see the day makaton and sign language are brought into the curriculum so all our children can communicate ❤️

not sure whether this is good or bad 🙈 can you guess where it is?